Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier, Art and Community

Tag: the Journey Projects

Beneath the Ogirishi Tree

The Journey Projects has moved back into the studio.  Pierre Coiron of Stability Engineering has approved the weight limits for the sculpture and Jason Smith of Smithworks Iron and Design, is forging the Ogirishi Tree out of steel, while I tackle the ornamentation for the […]

Beneath the Ogirishi Tree

The Journey Projects has moved back into the studio.  Pierre Coiron of Stability Engineering has approved the weight limits for the sculpture and Jason Smith of Smithworks Iron and Design, is forging the Ogirishi Tree out of steel, while I tackle the ornamentation for the […]

The Journey Projects at Southwest Library, Atlanta, GA

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When Ms. Pecolia Allen Wallace (far left) shared the photograph of her ancestors everyone stood up. She told us that many in her family lived beyond 100.

The Journey Projects was at Southwest Library on October 22 for an amazing Gathering Circle. Some residents waited for more than an hour to have their photographs scanned. I really appreciate their patience.  The photographs that were shared bore witness to the spirit of South Fulton County and the history of the area.

 

Pecolia Allen Wallace
Pecolia Allen Wallace’s ancestors are posed outside a building dressed in their Sunday best. Ms. Wallace named each and everyone in the photograph. The Journey Projects will interview Ms. Wallace to learn more about her remarkable ancestors from Georgia

 

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Claudette Williams and Julia Pye Gaston joined the Gathering Circle to share photographs and memories of family.

 

Pictured are Albert Studiemeyer and Dorothy Scott Studiemeyer, posed in front of a painted backdrop. Albert's casual demeanor is complemented by Dorothy's shy but supportive stance. According to Eloise: My father died when he was about 28 years old of heart disease. This is the only photo that I have of him. My mother lived to be 89 years old. She was born on August 2, 1912. I was born in Atlanta and I've been here all my life.
Pictured are Albert Studiemeyer and Dorothy Scott Studiemeyer, posed in front of a painted backdrop. Albert’s casual demeanor is complemented by Dorothy’s shy but supportive stance. Their smiles are almost identical. “My father died when he was about 28 years old of heart disease. This is the only photo that I have of him. My mother lived to be 89 years old. She was born on August 2, 1912. I was born in Atlanta and I’ve been here all my life”, writes Eloise S. Ballard

 

The Journey Projects at Southwest Library, Atlanta, GA

The Journey Projects was at Southwest Library on October 22 for an amazing Gathering Circle. Some residents waited for more than an hour to have their photographs scanned. I really appreciate their patience.  The photographs that were shared bore witness to the spirit of South […]

I have been offered a little house…

Wednesday, March 20, 2013. A generous patron has offered me the use of a little house in Madison, Georgia. It has four rooms, including the kitchen. I was told that the house had not been lived in for quite some time  so I had no […]

Redressing the Stone: the Journey Projects in Lithonia, Georgia

Redressing the Stone: the Journey Projects in Lithonia, Georgia

This photo taken on Swift Street in Lithonia, Georgia. The rail line runs along Swift Street and passes through downtown.

First Church Ancestor, John Thomas Gayton, Washington State Pioneeer

Born a few months after the end of the Civil War, John Thomas Gayton drove to Seattle by stagecoach in 1888 from Yazoo City, Miss. A year later, as Sheriff’s Deputy, Gayton helped fight Seattle’s Great Fire During his first years here, J.T., as he […]

First Church Ancestor, William Benjamin Reynolds

William Benjamin Reynolds is the grandfather of Miss Simone Reynolds Anicette. Simone’s mother, Suzzanne Reynolds Anicette, writes: “I have included a photo of my father, the ancestor my daughter chose to memorialize. I’ve also included a photo of the historic Congregational church in Guyana, South America where my father attended.  He […]

Welcome to the Journey Projects at First Congregational Church, Atlanta, GA

An early view of First Congregational Church

The Journey Projects is pleased to be commissioned to create a permanent site-specific artwork for the east wing of the newly renovated  First Congregational Church located in downtown Atlanta. According to the First Church website, “The First Congregational Church of Atlanta came into existence as a “gathered church” on May 26, 1867.  As one of the oldest African American Congregational churches in the United States, the early history of First Church is embedded in the history of the American Missionary Association (A.M.A.).”

The photo-based mixed media artwork will consist of pieced fabric containing photographic images of the ancestors of church members along with a large scale mixed-media painting that includes a photograph of a fountain that was installed outside the church shortly after the Atlanta race riots in 1906. African Americans did not have access to clean drinking water after they passed a certain point on Courtland Street downtown. In response to the lack of access to water, the church installed a fountain providing water to all. The photograph, possibly taken by Thomas Askew, documents this historic event.

The unveiling of the artwork is scheduled for October 6, 2012. Entitled “The Ancestral Memory of Water”, the artwork will be right at home among the newly restored stained glass windows. To learn more about this historically significant church, which has been placed on the National Registry of Historic Places please click the link:  First Church, Atlanta, GA.

In the coming weeks, look for posts about ancestors of church members and information about the history of the church.

Redressing the Stone

The project is called “Redressing the Stone” and I am working with residents to create a site specific artwork that will be shown at the historic Lithonia Women’s Club. The building is on the  National Registry of Historic Places. I am working with Mayor Deborah […]