Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier, Art and Community

Tag: lynn marshall-linnemeier

Beneath the Ogirishi Tree

The Journey Projects has moved back into the studio.  Pierre Coiron of Stability Engineering has approved the weight limits for the sculpture and Jason Smith of Smithworks Iron and Design, is forging the Ogirishi Tree out of steel, while I tackle the ornamentation for the […]

Beneath the Ogirishi Tree

The Journey Projects has moved back into the studio.  Pierre Coiron of Stability Engineering has approved the weight limits for the sculpture and Jason Smith of Smithworks Iron and Design, is forging the Ogirishi Tree out of steel, while I tackle the ornamentation for the […]

Sculpture Update

Core of sculpture
On Friday, February 7, I got to see the core of the sculpture, which will be installed in the library. I am collaborating with Jason Smith, owner of Smithwork’s Iron and Design in Decatur. I had already seen the benches and was very pleased. The sculpture will rise to 18′ and will have approximately 20 branches along with leaves and other ephemera.
This represents the uppermost part of the tree and will contain additional branches and ornamentation. The sculpture entitled "Beneath the Origishi Tree" references "Newbouldia laevis", a tree grown in Africa that is used by healers.
This represents the uppermost part of the tree and will contain additional branches and ornamentation. The sculpture entitled “Beneath the Origishi Tree” references “Newbouldia laevis”, a tree grown in Africa that is used by healers. I will provide more updates and sketches as we continue to work on this most important part of the overall installation for the the Wolf Creek project. 

 

 

Sculpture Update

   

Young Photographers!

The commission awarded by the Fulton County Commission is the largest awarded to me and the Journey Projects to date. I  immediately thought about the notion of sustainability, which includes not only supporting local merchants  but  also sustaining local artists.  The commission presents the opportunity […]

First Church Ancestor, John Thomas Gayton, Washington State Pioneeer

John Thomas Gayton

Born a few months after the end of the Civil War, John Thomas Gayton drove to Seattle by stagecoach in 1888 from Yazoo City, Miss. A year later, as Sheriff’s Deputy, Gayton helped fight Seattle’s Great Fire

During his first years here, J.T., as he was known, worked his way through Wilson’s Modern Business College as a painter, painting contractor and bellboy. Eventually he became the first black head steward at the prestigious Rainier Club.

In 1904, he was appointed bailiff for the U.S District Court. Despite his fourth grade education, his quest for knowledge landed him an appointment as Federal Court Librarian. While there he earned a reputation as a knowledgeable and conscientious worked. Known as “Judge”, his ever-present boutonniere and courtly manner became a fixture at the law library. He reluctantly retired in 1953 while in his eighties.

Gayton and his wife Magnolia raised four children at their home on 16th Avenue North. The patriarch of five generations of Seattleites, Gayton helped establish the East Madison YMCA on 23rrd and Madison and the First African Methodist Episcopal Church on 14th Avenue and Pine. Both institutions still stand today.

John Thomas Gayton is the great-great grandfather of Taylor, Jacob and Rachel Jordan.

First Church Ancestor, William Benjamin Reynolds

William Benjamin Reynolds is the grandfather of Miss Simone Reynolds Anicette. Simone’s mother, Suzzanne Reynolds Anicette, writes: “I have included a photo of my father, the ancestor my daughter chose to memorialize. I’ve also included a photo of the historic Congregational church in Guyana, South America where my father attended.  He […]

Welcome to the Journey Projects at First Congregational Church, Atlanta, GA

The Journey Projects is pleased to be commissioned to create a permanent site-specific artwork for the east wing of the newly renovated  First Congregational Church located in downtown Atlanta. According to the First Church website, “The First Congregational Church of Atlanta came into existence as a […]