Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier, Art and Community

Recent Posts

Beneath the Ogirishi Tree

The Journey Projects has moved back into the studio.  Pierre Coiron of Stability Engineering has approved the weight limits for the sculpture and Jason Smith of Smithworks Iron and Design, is forging the Ogirishi Tree out of steel, while I tackle the ornamentation for the […]

Beneath the Ogirishi Tree

The Journey Projects has moved back into the studio.  Pierre Coiron of Stability Engineering has approved the weight limits for the sculpture and Jason Smith of Smithworks Iron and Design, is forging the Ogirishi Tree out of steel, while I tackle the ornamentation for the […]

Sculpture Update

Core of sculpture
On Friday, February 7, I got to see the core of the sculpture, which will be installed in the library. I am collaborating with Jason Smith, owner of Smithwork’s Iron and Design in Decatur. I had already seen the benches and was very pleased. The sculpture will rise to 18′ and will have approximately 20 branches along with leaves and other ephemera.
This represents the uppermost part of the tree and will contain additional branches and ornamentation. The sculpture entitled "Beneath the Origishi Tree" references "Newbouldia laevis", a tree grown in Africa that is used by healers.
This represents the uppermost part of the tree and will contain additional branches and ornamentation. The sculpture entitled “Beneath the Origishi Tree” references “Newbouldia laevis”, a tree grown in Africa that is used by healers. I will provide more updates and sketches as we continue to work on this most important part of the overall installation for the the Wolf Creek project. 

 

 

Sculpture Update

   

The Journey Projects at Southwest Library, Atlanta, GA

The Journey Projects was at Southwest Library on October 22 for an amazing Gathering Circle. Some residents waited for more than an hour to have their photographs scanned. I really appreciate their patience.  The photographs that were shared bore witness to the spirit of South […]

The Journey Projects at Southwest Library, Atlanta, GA

2013-10-22 18.07.03
When Ms. Pecolia Allen Wallace (far left) shared the photograph of her ancestors everyone stood up. She told us that many in her family lived beyond 100.

The Journey Projects was at Southwest Library on October 22 for an amazing Gathering Circle. Some residents waited for more than an hour to have their photographs scanned. I really appreciate their patience.  The photographs that were shared bore witness to the spirit of South Fulton County and the history of the area.

 

Pecolia Allen Wallace
Pecolia Allen Wallace’s ancestors are posed outside a building dressed in their Sunday best. Ms. Wallace named each and everyone in the photograph. The Journey Projects will interview Ms. Wallace to learn more about her remarkable ancestors from Georgia

 

2013-10-22 17.17.09
Claudette Williams and Julia Pye Gaston joined the Gathering Circle to share photographs and memories of family.

 

Pictured are Albert Studiemeyer and Dorothy Scott Studiemeyer, posed in front of a painted backdrop. Albert's casual demeanor is complemented by Dorothy's shy but supportive stance. According to Eloise: My father died when he was about 28 years old of heart disease. This is the only photo that I have of him. My mother lived to be 89 years old. She was born on August 2, 1912. I was born in Atlanta and I've been here all my life.
Pictured are Albert Studiemeyer and Dorothy Scott Studiemeyer, posed in front of a painted backdrop. Albert’s casual demeanor is complemented by Dorothy’s shy but supportive stance. Their smiles are almost identical. “My father died when he was about 28 years old of heart disease. This is the only photo that I have of him. My mother lived to be 89 years old. She was born on August 2, 1912. I was born in Atlanta and I’ve been here all my life”, writes Eloise S. Ballard

 

Young Photographers!

The commission awarded by the Fulton County Commission is the largest awarded to me and the Journey Projects to date. I  immediately thought about the notion of sustainability, which includes not only supporting local merchants  but  also sustaining local artists.  The commission presents the opportunity […]

The Journey Projects in South Fulton County!!!!

The Journey Projects will be at Atlanta-Fulton County Public Library Southwest Branch on Saturday, from 1:30 – 5:30 gathering photographs of ancestors who have transitioned from South Fulton County residents. The photographs will be included in the artwork for the library’s multipurpose room. You can […]

Wolf Creek Project Begins

The Journey Projects at Wolf Creek has begun. Students from South Fulton and South West Arts Centers participated in a cyanotype workshop. The students had a great discovering the magic of the medium.  In addition to the workshop, students photographers began learning about photography and will later take a field trip to Cascade Springs Nature Preserve to document the landscape. The Journey Projects was also at Cliftondale United Methodist Church where members shared photographs of their ancestors.

Children and adults enjoy gathering leaves, sticks and other objects to make the cyanotypes. It's a good way to point out things like indigenous plants and which plants are poisonous.
Children and adults enjoy gathering leaves, sticks and other objects to make the cyanotypes. It’s a good way to point out things like indigenous plants and which plants are poisonous.
Arranging the flowers and objects encourages students to explore basic graphic concepts such as line, shape and texture. The cyanotype fabric is placed on top of a piece of foam core and objects are arranged on top of the fabric. Glass is then placed on top of the objects to keep them in place. Objects that are heavy can just be placed on top of the fabric without the glass since they will not blow away. Exposure times vary with the intensity of the sun--usually anywhere from 5-15 minutes. You can do a test strip but I usually just watch the color of the fabric as well as the time.
Arranging the flowers and objects encourages students to explore basic graphic concepts such as line, shape and texture. The cyanotype fabric is placed on top of a piece of foam core and objects are arranged on top of the fabric. Glass is then placed on top of the objects to keep them in place. Objects that are heavy can just be placed on top of the fabric without the glass since they will not blow away.
Cyanotype SW
Kids then head outside to expose the fabric. Exposure times vary with the intensity of the sun–usually anywhere from 5-15 minutes. You can do a test strip but I usually just watch the color of the fabric as well as the amount of time the objects are in the sun.
After exposure the fabric is washed in water to clear the cyanotype chemical. A few drops of hydrogen peroxide will add contrast.
After exposure the fabric is washed in water to clear the cyanotype chemical. A few drops of hydrogen peroxide will add contrast.
The fabric is now ready to hang and dry. The students got to make to cyanotypes--one to keep and one to be sewn in the Wolf Creek Library art work.
The fabric is now ready to hang and dry. The students got to make to cyanotypes–one to keep and one to be sewn in the Wolf Creek Library art work.

Catching Up, In Progress

Reposted from FB. This is a self-portrait study for Angels In Straight Jackets, the Central State Hospital Project. I am working from research by Mab Segrest. We are particularly interested in intake documents of patients committed there. Charis LoveJoy (not her real name), an African American […]